Thread: To tyro: Nikon
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Old 05-26-2016, 09:20 PM
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tyro tyro is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Scotland, U.K.
Posts: 3,538
Default Health and Scanning....

Hello Les,

Thank you for your kind reply.

Curiously enough, I was talking to a friend of yours and Gladys about three weeks ago and she told me about your diagnosis. Having been a surgeon until I retired five years ago, I'm aware of lupus as well, of course, as Parkinson's but, although I had patients with those conditions on occasions, I never dealt with the treatment of those conditions per se as we always requested physicians or neurologists or whatever to do that while we concentrated on any surgical conditions the patients might have had. So I can fully understand why bright sunny days are not the best for you and that, all be this an unwelcome handicap, you can at least concentrate on other aspects of this hobby indoors at those times. And I do hope that you are gradually recovering following your recent hospital admission.

Anyway, by now you will have guessed that the friend I met was Lisa (delpeoples). I think she might still be in Ireland just now with her husband visiting his family. But she arrived on our shores a week or so before Kevin: she landed in Dublin and spent a couple of days in the company of our friend Noel (noel_byrne) before heading to Scotland for a quick tour. She was very keen to visit the little village of Strontian on the Ardnamurchan peninsula because her mother's ancestors came originally from there before emigrating to Australia in the late 1830s as a result of the Highland Clearances. Her great great great grandfather had built a bridge in Strontian in the 1820s and I went up to meet Lisa and we visited the bridge together - a lovely day and a pleasure to meet such a lovely lady too! I have a picture of Lisa next to "her" bridge but I presume it's not the sort of picture one should post on TE. Facebook perhaps.

Incidentally, unless you already know, Strontian was where, in the lead mines during the 1830s, a new metallic element was identified - Strontium - so named after the little village. So there's a fact with which to amaze your friends or gain points in the local pub quiz.

Thank you for letting me know about your scanning techniques. Although I've never actually seen one (only pictures of them), I believe that the Nikon film scanner really was the canine ovoid things as far as scanners were concerned. But they were also enormously expensive, so well done for having been able to borrow one. In fact, I believe that Nikon no longer make them and the older ones (still very expensive secondhand) only work with older computer operating systems. I presume you do mean the dedicated scanner that attaches to a computer and not the Nikon slide copying attachment that fits on a camera?

My wife bought me a Jessops film scanner a few years ago in the days of Windows XP and it worked well though the colours were sometimes a bit "off" and the contrasts were always a bit too strong. But that no longer works with Windows 10 and compatible drivers for it aren't available.

But I did do a little bit of thinking recently. You can still buy cheap film scanners (from around 50 or so) but I can imagine that the quality of the lenses and the sensors in those things must be pretty poor. So, thought I, why even think about such a cheap device when I have an excellent digital camera with a superb sensor and a lovely macro lens which is pin-sharp. I tried copying two or three slides with a Heath-Robinson set up with the camera and lens, an old shoe box with some holes cut in it to keep out extraneous light, a piece of white paper as a diffuser and a cheap LED lamp from Lidl as a light source - and the results weren't too bad at all and certainly no worse than from my old scanner. I might try to knock up a more professional type of "jig" along these lines and might even think of posting a couple of the slides I've scanned on TE.

But I've "blethered" enough. You two take care and keep well.

Kindest Regards and thank you once again,

John.
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