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Old 11-07-2010, 01:20 PM
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ranadip_rc ranadip_rc is offline
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Default Planning to move to DSLR. Help required for selecting the new one

I have a Nikon FM2. With 35 - 105 mm Nikkor lense (f stop 3.5 - 22), 24 mm Vivitar (f stop 2 - 16), 100 - 300 mm Vivitar lense. I love this camera because of its ease of use. All the ctrls (i.e shutter speed,aparture, focus) can be set without removing the eye from viewfinder .
Now a days cost of flim photography is increasing and also the hasseles & the waiting period. Getting 100 ASA flim is like searching niddle from a haysack.
For all the above reasons I am thinking to move to DSLR. Plan to stick to Nikon only. I have seen the literaure of different Nikon DSLRs. But could not find a model which can give my support of shutter speed from B to 4000, ASA 12 - 6400. Also I am looking for ease of use (like dial on the body to change the aparture, shutter speed without removing my eye from the viewfinder).
My questions
1. Which model of DSLR should I go for?
2. Which new lense will give me same range of aparture?
3. Can I use mu old lenses with new DSLR?

Thanks in advance
Ranadip
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Old 11-10-2010, 04:09 PM
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daveRen daveRen is offline
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hi Ranadip
I have used an Olympus E-1 and presently a Nikon D90. I find both cameras excellent to use with lots of flexibility with settings. The Nikon is producing higher quality images however.
With both these cameras (and probably most good DSLRs) you can set aperture and speed while composing your shot in the viewfinder using "control dials" - little wheels you turn with your thumb and trigger finger. Depending on what exposure mode you are in the 2 dials make set different things. For example - in Manual mode the Nikon front dial changes aperture and the rear changes speed. I typically use it in Aperture Priority mode with the front dial changing aperture (the camera picks the speed) and I have my rear dial programmed to change ISO. There is lots of flexibility in setting what the dials do through the set-up menus.

My Nikon D90 speed range is Bulb to 1/4000.

To give my opinion on a couple of your questions:
1. I think that Nikon and Olympus provide the best representation of color without post-processing (IMHO). I would suggest having a look at lots of images from the cameras you are interested in on the photo web-sites (including TrekEarth, Flickr, etc.) that allow searches by camera type and compare the results in terms of color, exposure accuracy, etc.
2. - not sure about which lens. Have a look on-line to see lens specs, keeping in mind the conversion factor as discussed below.
3. You can use some old lenses with the Nikons, maybe check the Nikon specs for the DSLR model you are interested in. However, unless you go to a "full-frame" camera you are looking at converting your focal length because the smaller sensors only use the center portion of a full-frame lens. Typically a "Digital Lens" has been optically designed for the smaller sensors. With the Nikon D90, I believe there is a conversion factor of around 1.5. For example my 16 - 85mm Nikor lens converts to the "35mm equivalent" of 28 - 128mm.

- hope this helps, .......... Dave
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Old 11-12-2010, 04:49 AM
jeskel jeskel is offline
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I think that Nikon and Olympus provide the best representation of color without post-processing (IMHO). I would suggest having a look at lots of images from the cameras you are interested in on the photo web-sites (including TrekEarth, Flickr, etc.) that allow searches by camera type and compare the results in terms of color, exposure accuracy, etc.
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:05 PM
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ranadip_rc ranadip_rc is offline
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@Dave - Thanks Dave for your inputs. It's really helpful.I'll look into the lens details before I choose one.
While browsing through different camera shops, one shop assistant told me that, I can use my old Nikor lens, but she advised not to change the lens frequently. It may damage the sensors present in the camera body. As you are also using the Nikon D90 with old Nikor 18 -85 mm lens, have you face this problem?

@jeskel - thanks for your input.

Last edited by ranadip_rc; 11-12-2010 at 02:10 PM.
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Old 11-12-2010, 02:50 PM
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Sorry Ranadip, I don't have an older lens. I am new to Nikon and rarely change lenses anyway. The issue may be that the camera body has little gold contacts that rub on the metal body of the old lens when you install / remove the lens. I would think that if you were careful and perhaps used a little lubricant, it would be OK. Maybe someone else will chime in on that issue. Maybe even start a new post.

Another suggestion I saw someplace else was to have a look at a Nikon D80, you will get most of the usable features of the D90 at a lower cost.
- Dave
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