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Photographer's Note

The weather was lousy in my brief passage trough Washington, DC, but I was nearby and could not forgo glancing at the beautiful and interesting capital of the US. New equip. also!! A Canon 40D and a Canon 70-200 f/2.8 IS. Sweet!!
The approach here, if there is one..., is of a more geometrical and abstract kind, to which the haze contributes in setting a subdued environment.
Sorry for not commenting as much lately. I will try and catch up, but I have been following the work of my TE fellow photographers. Best regards for you all.
*****

Washington Monument
Above the Founding Fathers of the United States, George Washington earned the title "Father of the Country" in recognition of his leadership in the cause of American independence. Appointed as commander of the Continental Army in 1775, he molded a fighting force that won independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain. In 1787, as president of the Constitutional Convention, he helped guide the deliberations to form a government that has lasted for more than 200 years. Two years later he was unanimously elected the President of the United States. Washington defined the Presidency and helped develop the relationships among the three branches of government. He established precedents which successfully launched the new government on its course. He refused the trappings of power and veered from monarchical government and traditions and twice—despite considerable pressure to do otherwise—gave up the most powerful position in the Americas. Washington remained ever mindful of the ramifications of his decisions and actions. With this monument the citizens of the United States show their enduring gratitude and respect.
When the Revolutionary War ended, no man in the United States commanded more respect than George Washington. Americans celebrated his ability to win the war despite limited supplies and inexperienced men, and they admired his decision to refuse a salary and accept only reimbursements for his expenses. Their regard increased further when it became known that he had rejected a proposal by some of his officers to make him king of the new country. It was not only what Washington did but the way he did it: Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, described him as "polite with dignity, affable without familiarity, distant without haughtiness, grave without austerity, modest, wise, and good."
Washington retired to his plantation at Mount Vernon after the war, but he soon had to decide whether to return to public life. As it became clear the Articles of Confederation had left the federal government too weak to levy taxes, regulate trade, or control its borders, men such as James Madison began calling for a convention that would strengthen its authority. Washington was reluctant to attend because he had business affairs to manage at Mount Vernon. If he did not go to Philadelphia, however, he worried about his reputation and about the future of the country. He finally decided that, since "to see this nation happy… is so much the wish of my soul," he would serve as one of Virginia's representatives. The other delegates during the summer of 1787 chose him to preside over their deliberations, which ultimately produced the U.S. Constitution.
A key part of the Constitution was the development of the office of president of the United States. No one seemed more qualified to fill that position than Washington, and in 1789 he began the first of his two terms. He used the nation's respect for him to develop respect for this new office, but he simultaneously tried to quiet fears that the president would become as powerful as the king the new country had fought against. He tried to create the kind of solid government he thought the nation needed, supporting a national bank, collecting taxes to pay for expenses, and strengthening the Army and Navy. Though many people wanted him to stay for a third term, in 1797 he again retired to Mount Vernon.



Camera Model Canon EOS 40D
Shooting Date/Time 27/4/2008 18:10:08
Shooting Mode Aperture-Priority AE
Tv( Shutter Speed ) 1/80
Av( Aperture Value ) 7.1
Metering Mode Evaluative Metering
Exposure Compensation 0
ISO Speed 400
Lens EF70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM
Focal Length 70.0 mm
Image Size 3888x2592
Image Quality RAW
Flash Off
White Balance Mode Auto
AF Mode One-Shot AF
Picture Style Standard
Sharpness 6
Contrast 0
Saturation 0
Color tone 0
Color Space sRGB
Long exposure noise reduction 1:Auto
High ISO speed noise reduction 1:Enable
Highlight tone priority 0:Disable
File Size 12371 KB
Drive Mode Low-speed continuous shooting

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Additional Photos by Victor Scherrer (jvsb) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 129 W: 8 N: 332] (1382)
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